Naturalization Act of 1790

Naturalization Act of 1790
Great Seal of the United States
Other short titlesNaturalization Act
Long titleAn Act to establish an uniform Rule of Naturalization.
Enacted bythe 1st United States Congress
EffectiveMarch 26, 1790
Citations
Public lawPub.L. 1–3
Statutes at LargeStat. 103, chap. 3
Legislative history
  • Passed the House of Representatives on March 4, 1790 ([1])
  • Passed the Senate on March 19, 1790 ([2]) with amendment
  • House of Representatives agreed to Senate amendment on March 22, 1790 ([3]) with further amendment
  • Senate agreed to House of Representatives amendment on March 25, 1790 ([4])
  • Signed into law by President George Washington on March 26, 1790
Major amendments
Naturalization Act of 1795

The Naturalization Act of 1790 (1 Stat. 103, enacted March 26, 1790) was a law of the United States Congress that set the first uniform rules for the granting of United States citizenship by naturalization. The law limited naturalization to "free White person(s) ... of good character", thus excluding Native Americans, indentured servants, slaves, free black people and later Asians, although free black people were allowed citizenship at the state level in a number of states.

The Act was modeled on the Plantation Act 1740 with respect to time, oath of allegiance, process of swearing before a judge, etc.[5][6]

  1. ^ "Annals of Congress, House of Representatives, 1st Cong., 2nd sess". Library of Congress. 1790. p. 1463. Retrieved 6 August 2021.
  2. ^ "Annals of Congress, Senate, 1st Cong., 2nd sess". Library of Congress. 1790. p. 992. Retrieved 6 August 2021.
  3. ^ "House Journal. 1790. 1st Cong., 2nd sess". Library of Congress. p. 178. Retrieved 6 August 2021.
  4. ^ "Senate Journal. 1790. 1st Cong., 2nd sess". Library of Congress. p. 124. Retrieved 6 August 2021.
  5. ^ Michael Lemay, Elliott Robert Barkan, U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Laws and Issues: A Documentary History Archived 2020-08-05 at the Wayback Machine, pp 6-9. (1999) Retrieved 2014-03-29
  6. ^ Historical Timeline, History of Legal and Illegal Immigration to the United States, 1607-1799

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