United States Department of Labor

United States Department of Labor
Seal of the United States Department of Labor.svg
Seal of the U.S. Department of Labor
Flag of the United States Department of Labor.svg
Flag of the U.S. Department of Labor
Frances Perkins Building.JPG
The Frances Perkins Building, which serves as the headquarters of the U.S. Department of Labor
Agency overview
FormedMarch 4, 1913 (1913-03-04)[1]
HeadquartersFrances Perkins Building
200 Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, D.C., U.S.
38°53′33.13″N 77°0′51.94″W / 38.8925361°N 77.0144278°W / 38.8925361; -77.0144278Coordinates: 38°53′33.13″N 77°0′51.94″W / 38.8925361°N 77.0144278°W / 38.8925361; -77.0144278
Employees16,855 (2022)
Annual budget$14.2 billion (FY 2022)[2]
Agency executives
Websitewww.dol.gov

The United States Department of Labor (DOL) is one of the executive departments of the U.S. federal government. It is responsible for the administration of federal laws governing occupational safety and health, wage and hour standards, unemployment benefits, reemployment services, and occasionally, economic statistics. It is headed by the Secretary of Labor, who reports directly to the President of the United States and is a member of the president's Cabinet.

The purpose of the Department of Labor is to foster, promote, and develop the well being of the wage earners, job seekers, and retirees of the United States; improve working conditions; advance opportunities for profitable employment; and assure work-related benefits and rights. In carrying out this mission, the Department of Labor administers and enforces more than 180 federal laws and thousands of federal regulations. These mandates and the regulations that implement them cover many workplace activities for about 10 million employers and 125 million workers. Marty Walsh is the current secretary, having been confirmed by the United States Senate on March 22, 2021.

The department's headquarters is housed in the Frances Perkins Building, named in honor of Frances Perkins, the Secretary of Labor from 1933 to 1945.

  1. ^ "Chapter 1: Start-up of the Department and World War I, 1913-1921". History of the Department of Labor. Retrieved February 4, 2013.
  2. ^ "FY 2022 Department of Labor Budget in Brief" (PDF). U.S. Department of Labor. U.S. federal government. 2022. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2021-10-22.

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