Presidential transition of Joe Biden

Presidential transition of Joe Biden
Date of electionNovember 3, 2020
Transition startNovember 7, 2020
Inauguration dateJanuary 20, 2021
President-electJoe Biden (Democrat)
Vice president-electKamala Harris (Democrat)
Outgoing presidentDonald Trump (Republican)
Outgoing vice presidentMike Pence (Republican)
Headquarters1401 Constitution Ave NW
Washington, D.C., U.S.
Co-chairs
Websitebuildbackbetter.gov Edit this at Wikidata

The presidential transition of Joe Biden began on November 7, 2020, and ended on January 20, 2021. Unlike previous presidential transitions, which normally take place during the roughly 10-week period between the election in the first week of November and the inauguration on January 20, Biden's presidential transition was shortened somewhat because the General Services Administration under the outgoing Trump administration did not recognize Biden as the "apparent winner" until November 23.

Biden became the presumptive nominee of the Democratic Party for president in April 2020, and formally accepted the nomination the following August. Biden's transition team, led by Ted Kaufman, had already been announced on June 20. Further co-chairs joined the team alongside Kaufman in September. The 2020 presidential election took place on November 3. That evening, incumbent president Donald Trump declared himself the winner, based on his initial lead in tabulated in-person votes — a situation which was widely anticipated and quickly discredited as meaningless, since the votes counted at the time were not representative of the final total and it takes several days to count all the votes. Trump continued to falsely insist that he had won, alleging without evidence that Biden's increasing lead was due to widespread fraud, corruption, and other misconduct. He challenged the results in multiple lawsuits in multiple states, none of which resulted in a substantive victory.[1][2][3][4] Because of Trump's denials, there was a several-week delay before his administration began even limited cooperation with the Biden team.

After three and a half days of vote counting, on November 7, at approximately 11:30 a.m. EST, the Associated Press, along with major TV networks including CNN, ABC News, CBS News, NBC News, and Fox News, called the race for Joe Biden. After that, most sources described him as the president-elect. Nonetheless, GSA administrator Emily Murphy, a Trump appointee, waited until November 23 to issue the "ascertainment" letter declaring Biden the "apparent winner"[5][6] on the basis that Trump still disputed the election result. The declaration marked the official start of the transition, and withholding it from the Biden team had denied them $6.3 million, office space, government website status, and access to agencies.[7][8] Separately, Biden was denied daily classified national security briefings[9][10][11] until the Trump administration approved Biden's receiving such briefings on November 24.[12]

The Electoral College met on December 14, 2020, to formally elect Biden and Kamala Harris respectively, as president and vice president. The results were to be certified by a joint session of Congress on January 6, 2021, but due to an attempt by Trump supporters to overturn the results by storming and vandalizing the Capitol building, the certification was not completed until January 7.[13][14][15] Biden's transition ended when he was inaugurated at 12:00 p.m. EST on January 20, 2021, at which point his presidency began.

  1. ^ Blake, Aaron (November 11, 2020). "Trump lawyers suffer embarrassing rebukes from judges over voter fraud claims". The Age. Archived from the original on November 16, 2020. Retrieved November 16, 2020.
  2. ^ "Trump claims millions of his were 'deleted' by election system". The New Daily. November 12, 2020. Archived from the original on November 13, 2020. Retrieved November 16, 2020.
  3. ^ Tomazin, Farrah (November 13, 2020). "'Most secure in history': Security agencies refute Trump's election fraud claims". The Age. Archived from the original on November 15, 2020. Retrieved November 16, 2020.
  4. ^ Kaitlan Collins; LeBlanc (November 18, 2020). "Trump fires director of Homeland Security agency who had rejected President's election conspiracy theories". CNN. Archived from the original on November 18, 2020. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  5. ^ Holmes, Kristen; Herb, Jeremy (November 23, 2020). "First on CNN: Key government agency acknowledges Biden's win and begins formal transition". CNN. Archived from the original on November 23, 2020. Retrieved November 24, 2020.
  6. ^ Visser, Nick (November 23, 2020). "Trump Administration Finally Clears Way For Biden Transition To Begin". HuffPost. Archived from the original on November 24, 2020. Retrieved November 24, 2020.
  7. ^ Cite error: The named reference washingtonpost1 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  8. ^ Lewis, Simon; Reid, Tim (November 10, 2020). Coghill, Kim (ed.). "Biden camp calls for GSA to recognize victory so US presidential transition can begin". Reuters. Retrieved September 4, 2023.
  9. ^ Lewis, Simon (November 13, 2020). "President-elect Biden, denied classified intel briefings, to bring in national security experts". Reuters. Retrieved September 4, 2023.
  10. ^ Wilkie, Christina (November 17, 2020). "Biden receives national security briefing from experts outside government as Trump resists transition". CNBC. Archived from the original on November 23, 2020. Retrieved November 24, 2020.
  11. ^ Crowley, Michael; Shear, Michael D. (November 18, 2020). "Denied Briefings by Trump, Biden Meets With Former National Security Officials". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on November 24, 2020. Retrieved November 24, 2020.
  12. ^ Collins, Kaitlan; Cohen, Zachary (November 25, 2020). "White House has signed off on Joe Biden getting the President's Daily Brief". CNN. Archived from the original on November 25, 2020. Retrieved November 26, 2020.
  13. ^ Peñaloza, Marisa (January 6, 2021). "Trump Supporters Clash With Capitol Police At Protest". National Public Radio. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  14. ^ Amenabar, Teddy; Zauzmer, Julie; Davies, Emily; Brice-Saddler, Michael; Ruane, Michael E.; Chason, Rachel; Tan, Rebecca; Olivo, Antonio; Hermann, Peter (January 6, 2021). "Live updates: Hundreds storm Capitol barricades; two nearby buildings briefly evacuated; Trump falsely tells thousands he won". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  15. ^ Hooks, Kris; Rodd, Scott (January 6, 2021). "Trump Supporters, Proud Boys Converge On California's Capitol To Protest Electoral College Count". CapRadio. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.

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