New York City

New York
Nicknames: 
Interactive map outlining New York City
Coordinates: 40°42′46″N 74°00′22″W / 40.71278°N 74.00611°W / 40.71278; -74.00611Coordinates: 40°42′46″N 74°00′22″W / 40.71278°N 74.00611°W / 40.71278; -74.00611[1]
Country United States
State New York
RegionMid-Atlantic
Constituent counties (boroughs)Bronx (The Bronx)
Kings (Brooklyn)
New York (Manhattan)
Queens (Queens)
Richmond (Staten Island)
Historic coloniesNew Netherland
Province of New York
Settled1624 (approx)
Consolidated1898
Named forJames, Duke of York
Government
 • TypeStrong mayor–council
 • BodyNew York City Council
 • MayorEric Adams (D)
Area
 • Total472.43 sq mi (1,223.59 km2)
 • Land300.46 sq mi (778.18 km2)
 • Water171.97 sq mi (445.41 km2)
Elevation33 ft (10 m)
Population
 (2020)
 • Total8,804,190
 • Rank1st in the United States
1st in New York State
 • Density29,302.66/sq mi (11,313.81/km2)
 • Metro20,140,470 (1st)
DemonymNew Yorker
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (EST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (EDT)
ZIP Codes
100xx–104xx, 11004–05, 111xx–114xx, 116xx
Area code(s)212/646/332, 718/347/929, 917
FIPS code36-51000
GNIS feature ID975772
International airportsJohn F. Kennedy (JFK)
LaGuardia (LGA)
Newark Liberty (EWR)
Rapid transit systemNew York City Subway,
Staten Island Railway,
PATH
GDP (City, 2020)$830 billion[5] (1st)
GMP (Metro, 2020)$1.67 trillion[6] (1st)
Largest borough by areaQueens (109 square miles or 280 square kilometres)
Largest borough by populationBrooklyn (2020 Census 2,736,074)
Largest borough by GDP (2020)Manhattan ($610.4 billion)[5]
Websitewww.nyc.gov
Official name
TypeCultural
Criteria
  • Statue of Liberty: i, vi
  • Guggenheim Museum: ii
Designated
  • 1984 (Statue of Liberty, 8th session)
  • 2019 (Guggenheim Museum, 43rd session)
Part ofThe 20th-Century Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright (Guggenheim Museum)
Reference no.
RegionEurope and North America

New York, often called New York City (NYC) to distinguish it from the State of New York, is the most populous city in the United States. With a 2020 population of 8,804,190 distributed over 300.46 square miles (778.2 km2), New York City is also the most densely populated major city in the United States. Located at the southern tip of New York State, the city is the center of the New York metropolitan area, the largest metropolitan area in the world by urban landmass.[7] With over 20.1 million people in its metropolitan statistical area and 23.5 million in its combined statistical area as of 2020, New York is one of the world's most populous megacities. New York City is a global cultural, financial, and media center with a significant influence on commerce, entertainment, research, technology,[8] education, politics, tourism, dining, art, fashion, and sports. New York is the most photographed city in the world.[9] Home to the headquarters of the United Nations, New York is an important center for international diplomacy,[10][11] an established safe haven for global investors,[12] and is sometimes described as the capital of the world.

Situated on one of the world's largest natural harbors, with water covering 36.4% of its surface area, New York City is composed of five boroughs, each of which is coextensive with a respective county of the state of New York. The five boroughs—Brooklyn (Kings County), Queens (Queens County), Manhattan (New York County), the Bronx (Bronx County), and Staten Island (Richmond County)—were created when local governments were consolidated into a single municipal entity in 1898.[13] The city and its metropolitan area constitute the premier gateway for legal immigration to the United States. As many as 800 languages are spoken in New York,[14] making it the most linguistically diverse city in the world. New York is home to more than 3.2 million residents born outside the United States, the largest foreign-born population of any city in the world as of 2016.[15][16] As of 2018, the New York metropolitan area is estimated to produce a gross metropolitan product (GMP) of nearly $1.8 trillion, ranking it first in the United States. If the New York metropolitan area were a sovereign state, it would have the eighth-largest economy in the world. New York is home to the highest number of billionaires of any city in the world.[17]

New York City traces its origins to a trading post founded on the southern tip of Manhattan Island by Dutch colonists in approximately 1624. The settlement was named New Amsterdam (Dutch: Nieuw Amsterdam) in 1626 and was chartered as a city in 1653. The city came under English control in 1664 and was renamed New York after King Charles II of England granted the lands to his brother, the Duke of York.[18][19] The city was regained by the Dutch in July 1673 and was renamed New Orange for one year and three months; the city has been continuously named New York since November 1674. New York City was the capital of the United States from 1785 until 1790,[20] and has been the largest U.S. city since 1790. The Statue of Liberty greeted millions of immigrants as they came to the U.S. by ship in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and is a symbol of the U.S. and its ideals of liberty and peace.[21] In the 21st century, New York has emerged as a global node of creativity, entrepreneurship,[22] and environmental sustainability,[23][24] and as a symbol of freedom and cultural diversity.[25] The New York Times has won the most Pulitzer Prizes for journalism and remains the U.S. media's "newspaper of record".[26] In 2019, New York was voted the greatest city in the world per a survey of over 30,000 people from 48 cities worldwide, citing its cultural diversity.[27]

Many districts and monuments in New York City are major landmarks, including three of the world's ten most visited tourist attractions in 2013.[28] A record 66.6 million tourists visited New York City in 2019. Times Square is the brightly illuminated hub of the Broadway Theater District,[29] one of the world's busiest pedestrian intersections,[28][30] and a major center of the world's entertainment industry.[31] Many of the city's landmarks, skyscrapers, and parks are known around the world, as is the city's fast pace, spawning the term New York minute. The Empire State Building has become the global standard of reference to describe the height and length of other structures.[32] The Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village, part of the Stonewall National Monument, is considered the historic epicenter of LGBTQ+ culture and the birthplace of the modern gay rights movement.[33][34] Manhattan's real estate market is among the most expensive in the world.[35][36] Providing continuous 24/7 service and contributing to the nickname The City That Never Sleeps, the New York City Subway is the largest single-operator rapid transit system worldwide, with 472 passenger rail stations; and Penn Station in Midtown Manhattan is the busiest transportation hub in the Western Hemisphere.[37] The city has over 120 colleges and universities, including Columbia University, New York University, and the City University of New York system, which is the largest urban public university system in the United States. Anchored by Wall Street in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan, New York City has been called both the world's leading financial center[38]and the most powerful city in the world,[39] and is home to the world's two largest stock exchanges by total market capitalization, the New York Stock Exchange and Nasdaq.[40][41]

  1. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  2. ^ "ArcGIS REST Services Directory". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 20, 2022.
  3. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. June 23, 2018. Retrieved January 31, 2008. Search for feature ID 975772.
  4. ^ "2020 Population and Housing State Data". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2021. Retrieved November 24, 2021.
  5. ^ a b "Gross Domestic Product by County, 2020" (PDF). Bureau of Economic Analysis. December 9, 2020. Retrieved December 9, 2020.
  6. ^ "U.S. metro areas—ranked by Gross Metropolitan Product (GMP) 2020 | Statistic". Statista. Retrieved May 31, 2019.
  7. ^ "World Urban Areas" (PDF). Demographia. April 2018. Retrieved April 27, 2018.
  8. ^ "New York leads the way in our Tech City index". www.savills.co.uk. February 4, 2019. Retrieved July 30, 2022.
  9. ^ Swanson, Ana (August 26, 2015). "The world's most photographed places". The Washington Post. Retrieved September 25, 2022.
  10. ^ "NYC Mayor's Office for International Affairs". The City of New York. Archived from the original on June 16, 2015. Retrieved June 24, 2015.
  11. ^ "DDC New York". Digital Diplomacy Coalition, New York. Archived from the original on July 27, 2018. Retrieved August 11, 2018. Established in 2014, DDC New York has partnered with the United Nations, major tech and social media companies, multiple governments, and NGOs to bring unique programs to the area community.
  12. ^ [1] Ashkan Zandieh. Accessed June 1, 2022.
  13. ^ "A 5-Borough Centennial Preface for Katharine Bement Davis Mini-History". The New York City Department of Correction. 1997. Archived from the original on October 23, 2011. Retrieved October 26, 2011.
  14. ^ Lubin, Gus (February 15, 2017). "Queens has more languages than anywhere in the world—here's where they're found". Business Insider. Retrieved December 29, 2019.
  15. ^ "More Foreign-Born Immigrants Live in NYC Than There Are People in Chicago". HuffPost. December 19, 2013. Retrieved April 16, 2017.
  16. ^ "Population of the United Kingdom by Country of Birth and Nationality". Office for National Statistics. Retrieved October 26, 2021.
  17. ^ Jemima McEvoy. "Where The Richest Live: The Cities With The Most Billionaires 2022". Forbes. Retrieved May 10, 2022.
  18. ^ "History of New York City, New York". U-S-History.com. Retrieved September 9, 2012.
  19. ^ Cite error: The named reference npsnetherland was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  20. ^ Fortenbaugh, Robert (1948). "The Nine Capitals of the United States". United States Senate. Retrieved September 7, 2008.
  21. ^ "Statue of Liberty". World Heritage. UNESCO World Heritage Centre 1992–2011. Retrieved October 23, 2011.
  22. ^ "Venture Investment—Regional Aggregate Data". National Venture Capital Association and PricewaterhouseCoopers. Archived from the original on April 8, 2016. Retrieved April 22, 2016.
  23. ^ "The Latest: US Says World Closer to Key Goal on Climate Deal". The New York Times. Associated Press. April 22, 2016. Archived from the original on April 25, 2016. Retrieved April 22, 2016.
  24. ^ Foderaro, Lisa W. (September 21, 2014). "Taking a Call for Climate Change to the Streets". The New York Times. Retrieved April 22, 2016.
  25. ^ Phillips, Kristine (July 8, 2017). "New York mayor on Germany trip: The world should know that Americans don't align with Trump". The Washington Post. Retrieved July 9, 2017.
  26. ^ Cite error: The named reference NYTNewspaperOfRecord was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  27. ^ Gleason, Will (March 11, 2019). "Citing its diversity and culture, NYC was voted best city in the world in new global survey". Time Out. Retrieved May 19, 2019. After compiling the thoughts of over 30,000 people, both from our NYC readership and half-a-world away, New York was voted the greatest city on the planet for 2019. In a hint as to why this happened, and why now, it also lead [sic] the categories of most diverse metropolis and best culture.
  28. ^ a b Appleton, Kate; Beattie, Rich; Glover, Adrien; Matthews, Lyndsey; Orcutt, April; Pramis, Joshua; Shields, Ann (November 10, 2014). "The World's Most Visited Tourist Attractions—No. 3: Times Square, New York City—Annual Visitors: 50,000,000". Travel + Leisure. Retrieved July 12, 2015. No. 3 Times Square, ... No. 4 (tie) Central Park, ... No. 10 Grand Central Terminal, New York City
  29. ^ "Times Square". Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved May 10, 2011.
  30. ^ "The Most Jivin' Streetscapes in the World". Luigi Di Serio. 2010. Archived from the original on September 21, 2014. Retrieved May 10, 2011.
  31. ^ "New York Architecture Images—Midtown Times Square". 2011 nyc-architecture. Archived from the original on January 25, 2017. Retrieved May 10, 2011.
  32. ^ Multiple sources:
  33. ^ "Workforce Diversity The Stonewall Inn, National Historic Landmark National Register Number: 99000562". National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior. Archived from the original on March 6, 2016. Retrieved September 22, 2022.
  34. ^ "Obama inaugural speech references Stonewall gay-rights riots". North Jersey Media Group Inc. January 21, 2013. Archived from the original on May 30, 2013. Retrieved September 22, 2022.
  35. ^ "Manhattan, New York—Some of the Most Expensive Real Estate in the World Overlooks Central Park". The Pinnacle List. Archived from the original on November 29, 2014. Retrieved November 24, 2014.
  36. ^ Brennan, Morgan (March 22, 2013). "The World's Most Expensive Billionaire Cities". Forbes. Retrieved July 6, 2013.
  37. ^ Michael Kimmelman (September 30, 2016). "Penn Station Reborn". The New York Times. Retrieved August 3, 2022.
  38. ^ Cite error: The named reference NYCFinancialCapitalWorld was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  39. ^ "2021 Global Cities Report". Kearney. 2021. Retrieved July 30, 2022.
  40. ^ Bird, Mike (September 22, 2015). "The 25 cities with the most economic power on earth". Insider. Retrieved May 15, 2020.
  41. ^ Florida, Richard (May 8, 2012). "What Is the World's Most Economically Powerful City?". The Atlantic. Retrieved May 15, 2020.

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