Asylum in the United States

Annual Refugee Admissions to the United States by Fiscal Year, 1975 to August 2019
Annual Asylum Grants in the United States by Fiscal Year, 1990-2016

The United States recognizes the right of asylum for refugees as specified by international and federal law. A specified number of legally defined refugees who are granted refugee status outside the United States are annually admitted under 8 U.S.C. § 1157 for firm resettlement.[1][2] Other people enter the United States as aliens either lawfully or unlawfully and apply for asylum under section 1158.[3][4]

Asylum in the United States has three basic requirements. First, asylum applicants must not be convicted of a particularly serious crime or an aggravated felony.[5] Second, they must show a well-founded fear of persecution in their country of nationality and permanent residency.[6][7] Third, asylum applicants must prove that they would be persecuted on account of at least one of five protected grounds: race, religion, nationality, political opinion, or particular social group.[3][8][9]

Majority of asylum claims in the United States fail or are rejected. One third of asylum seekers go to courts unrepresented although those with legal representation have higher chances of winning.[10] In 2015, the world saw the greatest displacement of people since World War II, with 65.3 million people having to flee their homes.[11] The Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration (PRM), among other things, collects large amount of funds and then distribute it to refugee admission programs involved in relocating refugees into communities across the country.[12]

More than three million refugees from various countries around the world have been admitted to the United States since 1980.[13][2] From 2005 to 2007, approximately 40,000 refugees were accepted per year, comprising about one-tenth of total immigration. In terms of per capita refugee admissions, it ranked 28 of 43 industrialized countries reviewed by UNHCR from 2010 to 2014.[14] Comprising about 25% of the OECD's population, the U.S. accounted for about 10% of all refugee acceptances in the OECD from 1998 to 2007.[15][16]

  1. ^ Cite error: The named reference Reznik was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  2. ^ a b Cite error: The named reference lawful entry was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  3. ^ a b Cite error: The named reference asylum was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  4. ^ "Matter of D-X- & Y-Z-, 25 I&N Dec. 664" (PDF). Board of Immigration Appeals. U.S. Dept. of Justice. January 6, 2012. p. 666. It is well settled that an alien is not faulted for using fraudulent documents to escape persecution and seek asylum in the United States.
  5. ^ "Hernandez v. Holder, 760 F.3d 855". U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit. Harvard Law School. July 28, 2014. p. 859. An alien who has been convicted of an 'aggravated felony' is ineligible for asylum....
  6. ^ Cite error: The named reference Refugees-USCIS was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  7. ^ Rempell, Scott (2011-10-08). "Defining Persecution". Rochester, NY. SSRN 1941006. {{cite journal}}: Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  8. ^ Cite error: The named reference A-B- was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  9. ^ "Eduard v. Ashcroft, 379 F.3d 182". U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit. Harvard Law School. July 21, 2004. p. 189. Moreover, a finding of a well-founded fear of persecution is negated if the applicant can avoid persecution by relocating to another part of his home country.
  10. ^ Rabben, Linda 1947- Verfasser. (2016). Sanctuary and asylum : a social and political history. ISBN 978-0-295-99912-8. OCLC 964063441. {{cite book}}: |last= has generic name (help)
  11. ^ "Global Refugee Crisis". Partnership for Refugees. Archived from the original on 2016-11-17. Retrieved 2016-11-17.
  12. ^ Cite error: The named reference PRM was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  13. ^ "U.S. Refugee Admissions Program". United States Department of State. Retrieved 2021-12-05.
  14. ^ UNHCR (2015). Asylum Trends 2014: Levels and Trends in Industrialized Countries, p. 20. Retrieved 27 May 2016.
  15. ^ "Inflows of asylum seekers into OECD countries". OECD.org. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. Retrieved 2019-07-22.
  16. ^ "International Migration Outlook 2009". OECD.org. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. June 30, 2009. Retrieved 2019-07-22.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia · View on Wikipedia

Developed by Nelliwinne